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How Long Does it Hurt After Your First Time? Facts You Didn’t Know

Everyone's first time is unique and different. This is a fundamental fact. However, it is critical to be prepared for sex. How can you do this? Firstly, you should be willing to have sex with your partner, and you must explicitly give your consent to the same.


4 min read
How Long Does it Hurt After Your First Time? Facts You Didn’t Know

Everyone's first time is unique and different. This is a fundamental fact. However, it is critical to be prepared for sex. How can you do this? Firstly, you should be willing to have sex with your partner, and you must explicitly give your consent to the same. Secondly, practising safe sex with condoms is absolutely necessary.

Is First Time Sex Painful?

Do you also think, "Will it pain during the first intercourse?" The first time you experience vaginal intercourse, it might hurt you. Along with first-time sex pain, women also experience bleeding. Bleeding and pain during your first intercourse experience is subjective and doesn't happen to everybody. If your first experience with sex wasn't painful and you didn't bleed, don't worry. It's completely normal.

Why does sex hurt the first time?

This happens because, during penetrative sex, the hymen (a thin piece of skin at the entrance of the vagina) stretches and tears. The intensity of the pain varies for everybody. However, research suggests that women experience more sex pain compared to their male counterparts. Another reason for having first-time painful sex is that your vagina isn't well lubricated.

Women may experience a lack of sexual desire. To ensure you are in the mood, you may try Ayurvedic medicines to increase female libido.

How Long Does It Hurt After Your First Time?

Since your hymen can be a reason for first time painful sex, women who have thicker hymen skin tend to experience more pain than those who don't. After intercourse, the pain should last for an hour or so. If pain or soreness persists for more than one week, it's advisable to consult your doctor.

Also read: First time sex can cause pregnancy

Pain During Sex

It's normal if you experience pain the first time you have sex. However, pain during sex is uncomfortable and can impact your relationship. In most cases, women experience this if their vagina isn't well-lubricated. Let's take a look at some conditions that can cause pain during sex.

Vaginismus

This condition is the body's involuntary reaction towards the fear of penetration, resulting in a spasm in the vaginal muscles. If your vaginal muscles contract before penetration, the friction can cause pain during sex.

Vaginal infections

Vaginal infections, including yeast infections, can cause pain during sex.  

Endometriosis

It's a condition that occurs due to tissue growth similar to tissues that line your uterus. It's a painful disorder and can cause pain during sex.

Problems with the uterus

Conditions like fibroids, which occur due to abnormal growth inside the uterus, can cause excruciating pain during sex.

Sexually transmitted diseases

STDs like herpes, genital warts and other types of sexually transmitted diseases can cause painful sexual intercourse.

Pain After Sex

After intercourse, some people may feel pain down there. Here are some conditions that can cause pain after sex:

UTI

Urinary tract infections cause inflammation in your vaginal area, which subsequently causes pain. A symptom of UTI is pain during urination.

Ovarian Cysts

Ovarian cysts are benign (non-cancerous) tiny sacs filled with fluid. If your ovarian cyst is large, it can cause abdominal cramping after intercourse.

PID

The pelvic inflammatory disease occurs when sexually transmitted infections are left untreated. It's a condition of the upper reproductive tract organs. It causes inflammation and soreness in your upper pelvic area. Moreover, PID can cause pain in the pelvic area during or after sex.

Chafing

If you aren't lubricated enough before sex, then you might experience painful intercourse. Chafing is caused by increased friction, and it also makes your sexual experience uncomfortable. This pain can persist for some time after sex.

How To Have Sex The First Time Without Pain?

Lubrication

If you wonder, "Is it painful to have sex?" The answer is, it can be if your vagina is not well lubricated. It's essential to have a lubricated vagina to reduce the friction caused by penetration. If your vagina cannot secrete natural lubricant, then you can use artificial lubricant available in the market to make your sexual experience more comfortable.

Use a pillow

If you experience pain with deep penetration, then you can use a pillow for support. Place the pillow underneath your pelvic region to get that added support.

Communication

If you feel any discomfort, it's always best to communicate it to your partner. Don't hesitate to open up to your partner about your concerns. For a positive sexual experience, ask your partner to take it slow and express how you feel.

Is First-Time Sex Pain A One-Time thing?

A lot of women have questions like, "Does sex hurt the first time"? Sex might hurt for the first time, but as intimidating as it sounds, the pain usually settles down over time. The hymen tend to get accustomed to the stretching during penetrative intercourse, and the pain starts diminishing. In most cases, the pain subsides after a few sexual encounters. However, if you still experience pain or bleeding or any burning sensation, you should contact your doctor.

So, In a Nutshell, Is the Pain Worth It?

Sex, even for the first time, should not be too painful. There are multiple ways to ease into sex, such as relaxing your pelvic muscles, using a lubricant and having an understanding partner. If you feel any discomfort during a sexual act, let it be known to your partner. Communication and finding avenues to have sex that work for both of you is the most important. If the pain after sex is too excessive, please do not hesitate to visit a gynaecologist immediately.


Also read: How to confirm whether sperm went inside?

References

E. J. Bartley, R. B. Fillingim (2013) Sex differences in pain: a brief review of clinical and experimental findings (British Journal of Anaesthesia) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690315/

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